janiedean:

lepidum-libellum:

Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes, Season 1 Episode 25.

#ahahahaahaha thIS SHOW WAS FOR CHILDREN #cap LITERALLY goes to the afterlife dimension #sees that Bucky ain’t there #and says FUCK NO to death #just NOPES back into his original dimension #and if coming back to the shitty world of the living just to find your not-dead friend ain’t love guys i’m sorry idk what to tell you (via stuffimgoingtohellfor)

OH MY GOD I HAD NO IDEA

will-graham-i-am:

Aaron Paul, Smashed BTS

40514294s:


It is hard to find New York’s Richardson Spite House in this photo of Lexington Avenue and 43rd Street, because it looks like a facade on the building at left that almost, but not quite, rises to roof level. Here’s the story behind this fantastic achievement in grudge-settling: In the late 1800s, a clothier wished to erect apartments on a parcel extending almost all the way to Lexington Avenue. But blocking his chances of abutting the avenue was a narrow strip of land, 104 feet long but only 5 feet wide, owned by reputed miser Joseph Richardson.
The men haggled but couldn’t agree on Richardson’s asking price of $5,000, so the clothier built his apartments anyway, leaving the narrow strip untouched. Richardson responded by drafting plans for a 5-foot-wide tenement house that would brick up all of the neighboring apartments’ windows. "Not only will I build the houses, but I will live in one of them and I shall rent to other tenants as well," he’s reputed to have said, presumably chuckling and sipping from a boiling glass of bile.

via A Brief History of Houses Built Out Of Spite, the thing that has made me most joyous on this day

40514294s:

It is hard to find New York’s Richardson Spite House in this photo of Lexington Avenue and 43rd Street, because it looks like a facade on the building at left that almost, but not quite, rises to roof level. Here’s the story behind this fantastic achievement in grudge-settling: In the late 1800s, a clothier wished to erect apartments on a parcel extending almost all the way to Lexington Avenue. But blocking his chances of abutting the avenue was a narrow strip of land, 104 feet long but only 5 feet wide, owned by reputed miser Joseph Richardson.

The men haggled but couldn’t agree on Richardson’s asking price of $5,000, so the clothier built his apartments anyway, leaving the narrow strip untouched. Richardson responded by drafting plans for a 5-foot-wide tenement house that would brick up all of the neighboring apartments’ windows. "Not only will I build the houses, but I will live in one of them and I shall rent to other tenants as well," he’s reputed to have said, presumably chuckling and sipping from a boiling glass of bile.

via A Brief History of Houses Built Out Of Spite, the thing that has made me most joyous on this day

theopteryx:

help me i’m suuuuuuuper into cats liking bucky barnes completely against his will

theopteryx:

help me i’m suuuuuuuper into cats liking bucky barnes completely against his will

queer-terror:

some buckys

It’s literally until you don’t have dialogue when you get to that point of realising how much communicating we do with speaking and talking. I didn’t have that. I was super-aware of having just eyes to work with, but it made the job more interesting. Sebastian Stan on the Winter Soldier’s physicality

stankface:

jhoiraartificer:

stankface:


like a falcon, he strikes

PERPETUALLY FREAKING OUT SINCE THIS IS THE FIRST TIME I’VE SEEN BLACK MEN BE COMPARED TO ANGELS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Came over to reblog this directly from you to make sure you see it:

Straight from the comics, Captain America and the Falcon #136 (April 1971). Sam has a lot of my favorite comics panels, actually.

I am crying tears of happiness, thank you

stankface:

jhoiraartificer:

stankface:

like a falcon, he strikes

PERPETUALLY FREAKING OUT SINCE THIS IS THE FIRST TIME I’VE SEEN BLACK MEN BE COMPARED TO ANGELS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Came over to reblog this directly from you to make sure you see it:

Straight from the comics, Captain America and the Falcon #136 (April 1971). Sam has a lot of my favorite comics panels, actually.

I am crying tears of happiness, thank you

For Jesse (and the audience) the spider is obviously an harbinger of the grim reaper … after all, we first saw it when Todd shot the little boy Drew in cold blood, also out in the desert. But spiders eat flies, which also represent death, or a preoccupation with death. Considering all the mythology around the arachnoids and their webs, could the return of the fuzzy desert spider be seen as another kind of sign?

This is one of those rare moments when the symbolism in Breaking Bad is a bit too heavy-handed. We get it: Jesse is thinking about the things that brought him there, including Drew Sharp, whose death was signaled by the tarantula, etc. Not just death, it represents slow, creeping death, and by extension the creeping guilt associated with the deaths Jesse feels responsible for.

But there is something interesting in the fact that it isn’t just any spider, but specifically a tarantula. Spiders are predators, and by this point Jesse, who pretty much believes he has come there to die, is thinking of Walt as a predator. But if Walt pictured himself as a spider, it wouldn’t be as a tarantula. Walt thinks of himself as an operator, sitting in the center of his web, marshaling every resource to achieve total control. Tarantulas don’t spin webs, though–for Jesse, things are much more straightforward. He’s not thinking of systems, of multiple events conspiring against him. He’s thinking in stark terms of right and wrong, of guilt and damnation. Walt, thinking of webs, totally misunderstands Jesse’s desperation as paranoia, and offers him an escape from the system. But all Jesse wants is absolution. And it is a very small step from there to wanting revenge. [x]